More women than men get chronic kidney disease, but most unaware they have it

March 9, 2018

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects more women than men, but most people with this condition don’t know they have it. One in seven Americans has chronic kidney disease, a condition that can lead to kidney failure and means your kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood the way they should. CKD affects 16 % of women and 13 % of men. Approximately 700,000 people in the United States have kidney failure treated with dialysis or a kidney transplant.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) urge women from all over the world to equip themselves and their loved ones with knowledge about the disease and take the following steps to prevent of getting CKD: consume healthier foods (such as fresh fruits, fresh or frozen vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free dairy products), be physically active for 30 minutes or more on most days, reduce screen time, and aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night and join family, friends, or co-workers in encouraging each other to stick to a healthy routine.


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Category: Features, Health alert

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