White rice, Not nice

March 31, 2012

Eating white rice may increase a person’s risk to type 2 diabetes, according to researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health. The study also determines if the association is stronger for the Asian population, who tend to eat more white rice than the Western world.

To address these, the researchers analysed the results of four studies: two in Asian countries (China and Japan) and two in Western countries (USA and Australia). All participants were diabetes free at study baseline. Results showed that diabetes is strongly associated amongst women than men and that the more white rice eaten, the higher the risk of type 2 diabetes, with each increased serving of white rice (assuming 158 g per serving) contributing to a 10% increase in the risk of type 2 diabetes.

“In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that higher white rice intake is associated with a significantly elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, especially among Asian populations,” the authors write. “The recent transition in nutrition characterised by dramatically decreased physical activity levels and much improved security and variety of food has led to increased prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance in Asian countries.”

“In summary, this meta-analysis suggests that higher white rice intake is associated with a significantly elevated risk of type 2 diabetes, especially among Asian populations,” the authors write. “The recent transition in nutrition characterised by dramatically decreased physical activity levels and much improved security and variety of food has led to increased prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance in Asian countries.”

White rice is the predominant type of rice eaten worldwide .Compared to brown rice, white rice has a lower content of nutrients including fiber, magnesium, and vitamins, which may contribute to the increased risk. White rice is has high glycemic index (GI) values. High GI diets have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Tags: , , ,

Category: Wellness and Complementary Therapies

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.